CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy
Computer-generated imagery or CGI Graphics for short, is often used in today's media, especially in movies, games and other visual imageries. This technique of manipulating or creating digital images using computers is one that have shaped our memories and experiences. For example, our movie-viewing experience has changed since the dawn of digital editing of images and CGI graphics. Historically, movies were made to record physical movements ? an unbiased view of everyday life such as the arrival of a train, for example, as the first “film” recorded by the Lumiere brothers did. Today, however, movie makers are no longer contained by the world that everyone can see. In contrast, they can now build their own world right from their own imaginations, through CGI graphics. Today's movies have moved on from capturing reality, to creating new ones, even to the extent of imitating the former's three-dimensional aspects.
A modern movie could now portray fictitious characters as if they really did exist ? animating even minute details such as the movement of skin or fur, clothes and facial expressions. Take the character of Smeagol from the Lord of the Rings' movie trilogy, for example. Advance technology has enabled the producers of the series to portray the character perfectly ? from the strands of his hair to facial expressions mimicking that of a base actor through the aid of facial sensors and numerous hours of creating and editing CGI graphics. From the same movie trilogy, we have witnessed thousands of “orcs” and other fictitious characters marching to Helm's Deep where a war was about to break out. How could the production team have such a numerous number of actors come together? Well, they did not. That's the magic of today's CGI graphics: creating what isn't there or making something look according to how movie makers want them to. Now, let us recall the various out-of-this-world fictitious characters on this movie which spans from short hobbits, tall wizards, talking and moving trees, to flawless elves, hairy dwarves, fire-breathing monsters, elephant-like animals and gigantic spiders. Not only were these characters portrayed with their own personality, they were created to be visually distinguishable from each other and as realistic as possible. Aside from these characters, we also see numerous astounding sceneries on this movie trilogy. There were plains, castles, forests and caves which are all seemingly too real to be true because maybe, they aren't. Of course, there was a base setting in Australia where they shot these scenes, but some footages simply went against the laws of physics that one can only assume they were results of impressive CGI graphics.
As we suspend our logical thinking while watching movies, we are exposed to various experiences that although look and feel real, are only possible on screen. This is how CGI graphics redefine our modern world: by creating picture-perfect and seemingly real images of unreal objects.